Study: 100% Orange Juice Intake Results in Lower Daily Blood Glucose Compared to Orange Drink | Sci.News

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100% orange juice and sugar-sweetened beverages are not equivalent when looking at the impact on food intake and glycemic response, and they should not be grouped in the same category when making beverage decisions, according to new research from Toronto Metropolitan University.

Consuming 100% orange juice prior to a meal, when compared to an orange drink, suppresses food intake at the next meal and results in lower daily blood glucose concentrations in healthy, normal-weight adults.

Consuming 100% orange juice prior to a meal, when compared to an orange drink, suppresses food intake at the next meal and results in lower daily blood glucose concentrations in healthy, normal-weight adults.

Decreasing the intake of free sugars to 10% or less of daily energy intake is suggested by the World Health Organization to reduce the risk of unhealthy body weight and dental caries.

Consistent with these recommendations, some national dietary guidelines recommend reducing the intake of sugars from all sources.

Yet, because these recommendations do not distinguish the source of free sugars and are based primarily on data from observational studies, the physiological mechanisms underlying any observed effects cannot be readily determined.

“Our findings emphasize the importance of considering the source of sugars when looking at overall health effects,” said Toronto Metropolitan University’s Dr. Nick Bellissimo, senior author of the study.

The randomized, repeated measure study included 36 male and female adults with body mass index at normal levels who consumed 1 cup of 100% orange juice, orange flavored sugar-sweetened beverage and water two hours following a breakfast consisting of cereal, 2% milk and a breakfast bar.

Glycemic response, average appetite, and subjective emotions were measured every 15 minutes for 60 minutes in 34 participants.

Rest-of-day glycemic response and energy intake were determined using a continuous glucose monitor and food record in 31 participants.

Subjective sweetness and pleasantness were determined immediately after test beverage consumption.

Glycemic response, average appetite, and subjective emotions were measured every 15 minutes for 60 minutes.

Food intake was determined at a pizza lunch 60 minutes later.

Blood glucose was lower after 100% orange juice compared to the orange drink at 15, 30, and 45 minutes, but not after 60 minutes.

Rest-of-day blood glucose concentrations were lower after 100% orange juice compared with orange drink and water.

The findings also showed that food intake both at lunch and throughout the day were lower after consuming 100% orange juice compared with the orange drink.

The participants also enjoyed 100% orange juice more with a higher subjective pleasantness measure compared to the orange drink and water.

Substituting 100% orange juice for a sugar-sweetened beverage may decrease total caloric intake throughout the day and help mediate blood glucose levels.

100% orange juice includes flavonoids like hesperidin which may impact sugar absorption by delaying glucose transport resulting in a delayed glycemic response.

100% orange juice intake has been associated with higher intake of flavonoids, lower added sugars and higher-quality diets.

“Consumption of 100% orange juice as a preload resulted in higher caloric compensation, lower total daily energy intake, and lower blood glucose concentrations compared to the orange drink,” the researchers said.

“Future longitudinal studies are needed to assess whether the habitual replacement of sugar-sweetened beverages with 100% orange juice may contribute to healthier body weights and improved glycemic control.”

The paper was published in the journal Nutrients.

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Stephanie Robayo et al. 2024. Effect of 100% Orange Juice and a Volume-Matched Sugar-Sweetened Drink on Subjective Appetite, Food Intake, and Glycemic Response in Adults. Nutrients 16 (2): 242; doi: 10.3390/nu16020242

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